Tamara Ghosn, AARO Repair it Right Task Force: Extraordinary Drive

Tamara Ghosn (Photo: Razan Azawi)

Leadership takes many strategies and forms.

Tamara Ghosn joined the team at Roy Rump & Sons in 2008. Since then, she has become a Red Seal Certified Technician and recently transitioned from the back end of the shop to the front counter where she is currently serving as Service Manager. She is also a member of the Repair it Right Task Force created by AARO in conjunction with NASTF. CarCare Business recently sat down with her and asked her about her career path and her advice on being a technician and where the industry might be headed.

Why did you decide to become a technician?
I love cars. I’d always enjoyed dismantling and reassembling things. After taking my first shop class in high school, I knew I wanted to pursue this and under the guidance of a few teachers, I was presented with an opportunity called the OYAP—Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program. It got my foot in the door and within a few months working in a shop environment, my mind was made up.

Can you give us a brief history of your work background?
At 17, I started my apprenticeship at Roy Rump & Sons Tire & Auto Centre. They’re always at the forefront of new vehicle technology and diagnostic practices… excellent mentors who set great examples for the technician I wanted to become. Over the years, I discovered a strong passion for diagnostics and complex vehicle issues and today I’m the Service Manager. I was also granted the opportunity to teach the automotive AST program part-time at Algonquin College… one of the most gratifying experiences of my career.

Do you emphatically believe in training?
My beliefs in training extend beyond the stars! Many would say there have always been major changes in the automotive industry but we eventually catch up. I’d argue that technology in the next few years will likely see more change than it has in the last 50, and it’s difficult to ignore that—the automotive trade, especially the aftermarket, is not yet really prepared. As a group, I see us moving in the right direction—however, there are many technicians and business owners who haven’t seen the importance of investing in themselves and our future through training.

What would you tell young techs about fitting in?
I’d say it’s important to stay informed and be involved. Most of us get in because of our passion for cars and enjoy working with our hands, but staying in it long-term goes beyond that. The satisfaction you get after repairing your first car is something you’ll find yourself chasing, and it always gets better. Challenges coming our way can either be a stepping stool or a disturbance—it’s all about your approach!

What’s your role on the AARO Repair It Right Task force?
I’m on the Repair It Right Task force as a technician. AARO joined the National Automotive Service Task Force (NASTF), the U.S. counterpart to the Canadian Automotive Service Information Standard (CASIS). The purpose is to ensure the independent automotive repair shop has access to the information, flashing capabilities and reprogramming tools required to repair today’s vehicles. Service Information Requests (SIRs) can be submitted through AARO’s website when shops find themselves without the necessary service information to repair a vehicle regardless of the vehicle manufacturer.

One of my roles involves reviewing SIRs once they’ve been submitted and vetting them to ensure they fall within the correct parameters. SIRs should only be submitted once the repair facility has exhausted all available options to retrieve the information they require.

Where is the Aftermarket going?
I believe the entire infrastructure is going to change drastically. The breakneck speed of technology today isn’t showing any signs of slowing down. Independent service facilities, manufacturers and distributors all run the same risk of failure if we don’t find a way to collectively leverage our strengths and work with the OEMs to keep up with consumer demand.

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